Smile of Earth- 6

Spadix Inflorescence 

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Anthurium 

A Spadix is a type of inflorescence found in the Araceae family.

It consists of a spathe, which is simply a large leaf-like bract, colourful or showy, to attract pollinators. Spadix is the cylindrical inflorescence, basically a spike, with small flowers on a thickened, fleshy axis and it is protected by the spathe in bud stage.

Many Aroids are ornamental plants due to the Spadix and Spathe.

The sap of Aroids contains needle-like calcium oxalate crystals, which can be mildly toxic and can irritate hands and sensitive tissues. However, not all aroids are toxic and used as vegetable, including their leaves.

Some members of this family reproduce by seeds, whereas many have vegetative propagation.

The inflorescence of species such as Titan arum gives off a very pungent smell, often resembling rotten flesh.

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Peace Lily
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Wild Taro
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Calla Lilly
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Eventide- 13

Sri Lankan sunset

These fiery sunset moments were captured from the backyard beach of Hotel Palm Village in Colombo.

The scene was an enticing one with rich golden tones, a serene beach and soothing breeze.

The place reminded of any beach of Kerala!

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Rose-ringed parakeet

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Rose-ringed parakeets (Psittacula krameri) are regular visitors to my garden. They land on my Caesalpinia plant (Peacock flower plant) in small groups or in pairs to feast on the seeds. They are definitely a noisy lot!

We can easily identify the male and female birds. Males have a black-red neck band and females don’t. They have long tail feathers and very pleasing green plumage. In fact, it has given rise to the phrase ‘parrot-green’ to refer to that particular shade of green.

Rose-ringed parakeets are least threatened and have adapted well to changing habitats. I believe they can be trained to talk when caged and kept as a pet!

Here is a pair of lovely rose-ringed parakeets captured in my garden; the pictures were captured in a continuous series.

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Love you…
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Seal With A Kiss… 😊

Smile of Earth- 5

Heliconia

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Parakeet flower- Heliconia psittacorum

Heliconia, derived from the Greek word Helikṓnios, is a genus of flowering plants that are native to the tropical forests. All have bold leaves and showy flowers. Several species are widely cultivated as ornamentals and are known by common names like lobster-claws, wild plantains or parrot flowers.

Large, brightly hued bracts that cluster up a stem have inconsequential tiny flowers in their axils. Flower bracts are arranged in terminal racemes, which may be held erect or pendulant.

The plants grow and propagate from underground rhizomes, which can be broken apart and used to start a new plant.
The heliconia family, Heliconiaceae, is most closely related to the gingers and bananas.

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Heliconia bihai ‘Claw I’
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Pendant heliconia- Heliconia rostrata 
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Pendant heliconia- Habit

Smile of Earth- 4

Grass inflorescence

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Lemon grass- Cymbopogon citratus

It may not seem like grasses are flowering plants to a layman as the grass flowers don’t look quite like the showy colorful parts most people recognize as flowers. Grasses are definitely flowering plants.

The flowers or inflorescence is called a “spike” or sometimes a “panicle.” Though individual flowers are not attractive, the inflorescence is very much noticeable and some of the ornamental grasses have pretty spikes.

Grasses belong to a large and nearly ubiquitous family of monocotyledonous flowering plants known as Poaceae or Gramineae. This includes the cereal grasses, bamboos and the grasses of natural grassland and cultivated lawns and pastures.

Some grass flowers are presented in this post.

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Fountain grass – Pennisetum setaceum
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Indian lovegrass- Eragrostis pilosa
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Umbrella grass- Cyperus alternifolius

 

Eventide- 12

Sunset from hilltop

Sundown as viewed from Diablo Mountain (California) viewpoint was enchanting.

Though the evening was a bit hazy with mist, I could get lovely view of the magnificent moment!!

These pictures were captured with P & S cam sometime back.

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Flies…flies…!

Flies are insects with a single pair of wings.                                                                      Anybody with a lush garden and keen observation can spot these flies around your garden, as I could!

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Crane fly- Pselliophora laeta

Crane fly mimics a paper wasp but it is harmless. This type of crane flies are generally seen in Asian countries. The larvae feed on decaying matter.

Robber fly or Assassin fly is a predator, feeding on other small insects and pests in the garden.

Long-legged flies are very small flies with large, prominent eyes and a metallic cast to their appearance. Adults are predators, feeding on aphids, larvae of mosquitos etc.

Black soldier flies are of great economic importance as the larvae decompose organic matter to form manure. They are very common in gardens.

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Robber fly- Philodicus sp
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Asian long-legged fly- Condylostylus spp
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Black Soldier fly-  Hermetia illucens

Smile of Earth-3

Sage or Salvia

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Coral nymph- Salvia coccinea

Sage (genus Salvia) has about 900 species of herbaceous and woody plants that belong to the mint family. They are generally perennial and aromatic. The name Salvia (“salviya”) derives from the Latin ‘Salvere’  meaning “to feel well and healthy”, referring to the herb’s healing properties.

Some  are important as sources of flavouring and many are grown as garden ornamentals. The flowers are usually tubular with two lips and only two stamens and are borne in terminal inflorescences. They generally produce a showy display with flower colours ranging from blue to red, with white and a variety of shades of these colours.

S. divinorum is a hallucinogenic plant native to Mexico.

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Salvia greggii ‘Blue Note’ Sage
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Salvia Greggii ‘Furman’S Red’ 
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Hot lip sage- Salvia microphylla

Eventide- 11

Sunset in a Countryside

The setting sun was captured while visiting Balmuri falls in Srirangapatna.

The first two shots were captured on the move through the nearby village. Last two pictures were captured at the falls.

I loved the sunset scenes over fields that were barren after the harvest!

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Lynx Spiders

Let us meet friends from my garden once again. This time I will introduce Lynx spiders.

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White lynx spider- Oxyopes shweta

Most species of lynx spiders do not use webs and they spend time hiding under leaves and waiting to ambush the prey. Most of them have large spiny bristles on their legs that may assist in confining the prey in their grasp.

Lynx spiders are very agile and have a small body of barely 1cm, with long legs. They have very good eyesight with 8 eyes! Generally they run away from predators. Though they rarely bite human beings, a bite can cause swellings on the body part.

All pictures are clicked in my garden.

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Green lynx spider- Peucetia viridan
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Orange-backed lynx spider (With prey)- Oxyopes kohaensis sp. nov.  
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Orange lynx spider- Oxyopes sunandae